Kingsbridge Library Teens

randomhouse:

Mesmerizing. 

randomhouse:

Mesmerizing. 

(Source: ananasbooks, via lannomstaff)

authorsarahdessen:

ellelalee:

writing is hard

And this is mildly terrifying. 

(Source: gloomy-optimist)

“Some people, they can’t just move on, you know, mourn and cry and be done with it. Or at least seem to be. But for me… I don’t know. I didn’t want to fix it, to forget. It wasn’t something that was broken. It’s just…something that happened. And like that hole, I’m just finding ways, every day, of working around it. Respecting and remembering and getting on at the same time.”
— Sarah Dessen, The Truth About Forever (via quoted-books)

(via authorsarahdessen)

powells:

What book will you finally finish this summer? 

powells:

What book will you finally finish this summer? 

(via lclteens)

Reluctant Reader Wednesday: Trouble by Non Pratt
Hannah is a 15-year-old girl who’s pregnant because she made several bad choices in a row.  Aaron is a new classmate who is carrying emotional baggage of his own, but being an outsider it’s easier for him to see that Hannah needs help.  So he steps up to support her by pretending to be the father of her baby, and that’s where their friendship really begins.  This is a teenage pregnancy story that evolves into a much larger story about trust, friendship, secrets, and forgiveness.  

Reluctant Reader Wednesday: Trouble by Non Pratt

Hannah is a 15-year-old girl who’s pregnant because she made several bad choices in a row.  Aaron is a new classmate who is carrying emotional baggage of his own, but being an outsider it’s easier for him to see that Hannah needs help.  So he steps up to support her by pretending to be the father of her baby, and that’s where their friendship really begins.  This is a teenage pregnancy story that evolves into a much larger story about trust, friendship, secrets, and forgiveness.  

cheshirelibrary:

Writes of Passage - 50 Books That Will Change Your Life

[via worldbookday.com]

Young people and adults nominated the books that have rocked their worlds, to help us create the ultimate list of 50 BOOKS that will change YOUR life and keep you reading…

(via lclteens)

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:


Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.
I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:

Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.

I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

lindsaysmithdc:

Russian books, Russian chocolate.

  • The Boy on the Bridge by Natalie Standiford
  • Sekret by Lindsay Smith
  • Tsarina by Jackson Pearce

I read all of these books in the same year!  Does “YA historical fiction set in Russia” count as a new microtrend?

(via macteenbooks)

“When trouble strikes, head to the library. You will either be able to solve the problem, or simply have something to read as the world crashes down around you.”
— Lemony Snicket (via thesnicketfile)

(Source: facebook.com, via glendaleteenlibrary)

macteenbooks:

How many of you arrange your books by color?

macteenbooks:

How many of you arrange your books by color?

(Source: readingismyhustle)

lauriehalseanderson:

disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). 

Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). 

To Be Takei documentary official website. 

- Mod Dawes Sr. 

Signal boost this forever, please.

(via cmclibraryteen)

publishersweekly:

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Trailer is here…

prettybooks:

10 Children’s and YA First World War Books
Did you know that 100 years ago today was the start of the First World War? World War One began on 28th July 1914 and lasted until 11th November 1918. It’s one of history’s deadliest conflicts, but there’s few children’s and young adult books set during it (you’ll find much more about WWII). The centenary has meant that a whole host of children’s books surrounding WWI were published this year, so here’s a selection that I’ve come across, some read, some just on my wishlist. Head over to my other Pretty Books to find out more about these books.

(via yahighway)